Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Biography:

Prof. Lara Hanna-Wakim is Dean of the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences at the Holy Spirit University of Kaslik, (Lebanon) since 2013. She is the first scientist to represent the MENA Region as a regular member of the Governing Council of the International Union of Food Science and Technology – IUFoST since 2014.
She is the Focal Point for Lebanon of the Arab States Green University Network at UNEP and the National Food Safety Expert at UNIDO. She served as Vice-President of GCHERA 2015 Conference.

She is member of the Lebanese Association of Food Scientists and Technologists (LAoFST). She has been honored as Women Leader in Lebanese universities and research pioneers, at the Lebanese Parliament, by the National Initiative for the Centennial of Greater Lebanon, “Lebanon the State of Knowledge”.
Prof. Lara Hanna-Wakim holds an Agricultural Engineering Diploma from USEK (Lebanon), an MS in Food Science from the INAP-G (France), and a PhD in Food Process Engineering from AgroParis Tech (France).
She holds as well an MA/PG Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education from University of Chester (UK) and an MS in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education from University of Norwich (USA).

 

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: The world is facing serious health problems concerning dietary and physical activity patterns as well as chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cancers and others. NCDs account for 70% of the global burden of disease and 60% of global mortality. Studies have shown that the three leading factors of global burden are high blood pressure, obesity, smoking and high alcohol consumption. The purpose of this analysis is to assess the health conditions and evaluate the nutritional status and eating behavior, of Lebanese population, in order to build national guidelines aiming to improve the health of the concerned category through intervention programs. Methodology and Theoretical orientation: A cross sectional study will be conducted including Lebanese individuals sampled from all Lebanese districts, covering all socio-economic levels, aging between 19 and 65 years old. Data is collected through validated questionnaires, in addition to clinical evaluation, physical evaluation and biochemical tests. Statistical analysis will be carried out and multivariate models will be used in order to evaluate the association between several independent variables and the health status as well as the nutritional status of Lebanese population. Findings: The results are expected to show that overweight and obesity, is highly prevalent among Lebanese population, with a higher percentage for men than women. Frequency of smoking and alcohol consumption is expected to be high with a greater percentage of males reporting those results. The Lebanese adults are expected to be highly sedentary, due to the fast lifestyle, which will be associated to chronic diseases, and obesity. The Lebanese population is probable to show a poor to moderate nutritional status because of unhealthy and modernized eating behavior. Conclusions: The health and nutritional status of the Lebanese population is to be improved through public health prevention policies and programs.

Biography:

 Dr. Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, cell biology, and bioprocessing for both bio pharmaceuticals,and food bio-ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening, culture improvement, molecular biology, genetic engineering, fermentation research (antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids), biochemistry (metabolic pathways, enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion), and analytical biochemistry.
Dr. Ibrahim was Principal research scientist and external research liaison for Kraft Foods R&D with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and bioprocessing. He holds three bioprocessing patents and several publications. After retirement from Kraft Foods he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for startup biotechnology in United States / Overseas and a key note speaker / workshop for both international food science and bio pharmaceuticals conferences.
Dr. Ibrahim received his B.S. in Biochemistry with honor and two M.S. degrees in Industrial fermentation and in Microbial physiology. He received his Ph.D. in Basic Medical Science (Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular biology) from New York Medical College.
Since 1979 he is a member of American Chemical Society, American Society of Microbiology, and Society of Industrial Microbiology. Dr. Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, cell biology, and bioprocessing for both bio pharmaceuticals, and food bio-ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening, culture improvement, molecular biology, genetic engineering, fermentation research (antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids), biochemistry (metabolic pathways, enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion), and analytical biochemistry.
Dr. Ibrahim was Principal research scientist and external research liaison for Kraft Foods R&D with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and bioprocessing. He holds three bioprocessing patents and several publications. After retirement from Kraft Foods he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for startup biotechnology in United States / Overseas and a key note speaker / workshop for both international food science and bio pharmaceuticals conferences.
Dr. Ibrahim received his B.S. in Biochemistry with honor and two M.S. degrees in Industrial fermentation and in Microbial physiology. He received his Ph.D. in Basic Medical Science (Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular biology) from New York Medical College.
Since 1979 he is a member of American Chemical Society, American Society of Microbiology, and Society of Industrial Microbiology

Abstract:

Functional oligosaccharides are non-digestible by human gut enzymes and providing health benefits as fibers and prebiotics. Functional oligosaccharides have mildly sweet taste and other characteristics such as, mouth feeling. This mouth feeling characteristic interest food industry to incorporate these functional oligosaccharides in foods as a partial substitute for fat and sugars, and to improve food texture. With the exception, of malto-oligosaccharides and trehalose, functional oligosaccharides are non-digestible in small intestine digestive enzymes and reached large intestine (colon) where it acts as a growth factor (prebiotics) to enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) and inhibit pathogenic bacteria in the colon via competitive exclusion. These benefits to colon and for other health benefits, plus unique characteristics have increased the global market of functional oligosaccharides applications in foods, pharmaceuticals, and in other industrial sectors. Due to, the increase demand of functional oligosaccharides for their health benefits and characteristics, functional oligosaccharides are currently produced enzymatically at higher yield, and lower cost from different natural sources of carbohydrates as a replacement of costly plants extraction methods..

 

  • Food science and Technology
Location: 2

Chair

Omaima Nasir

Taif University, Turabah University College, Saudia Arabia

Session Introduction

Shashi Vemuri

Telangana state Agricultural University University , India

Title: Challenges to Food Security

Time : 11:30-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Shashi Vemuri  was Formerly Senior Professor/ principal scientist and university head of entomology in India. with specialization in Pesticide Residues, Insect Toxicology, food safety and food security issues  and worked for more than 36 years indifferent capacities as Professor/ Researcher and Extension scientist. He/has published more than 130 research articles, 4 book chapters He has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals. Participated  in more than 50 International Conferences and member of various Professional Committees and organizations

 

 

 

Abstract:

Food security is access to enough food by all people at all time for an active and healthy life. As per  FAO Food security exists when all people at all times have both physical and economic access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food. An increasing global population, in combination with climate change is a threat to food security as arable land becomes more scarce. The Global population which is 6.1 billion by 2000 is projected as 9 billion by 2050. The Growth in the agriculture sector is an effective tool to achieve food security and reduce poverty. Investing more funds in agricultural research and development are key for increasing agricultural productivity. For achieving zero hunger Governments and the private sector need to reenergize their science and technology research capacities.  Otherwise Global efforts to achieve the zero hunger 2030 could fall short. Worldwide Investment in agricultural sciences is on the decline for  many years. We need 60 percent more food to feed a hungry world by 2050 to meet 9 B. This needs to come from smallholder farmers who produce a majority of the  world’s food. Efforts to leverage science and technology in the field of agriculture must involve everyone. Need to develop the capacity for innovation in small holder farmers.  The skills and capacities of all  key players  involved  in all aspects of the agricultural innovation system must be upgraded through education and training at all levels.  Small holder farmers need an enabling environment for innovation including good governance, stable macro economic conditions, transparent legal and regulatory regimes,   secure property rights, risk management tools and market infrastructure, India is truly developing now and income, infrastructure, per capita income has also developed. However the major problem is food management and it’s distribution.Most efforts to reduce hunger concentrate more on agricultural production. Food losses due to a variety of issues are addressed less (biological, chemical and physical forces). Despite ensuring ample availability of food, existence of food insecurity at the micro-level in the country has remained a formidable challenge for India. Malnutrition and poverty are the main causes for the adoption of food security in India. Globalization may and may not help food security. Many people feel that globalization will definitely help food security due to trade but its matter of debate.

 

  • Food Nutrition and Dietary Supplement
Location: 1

Session Introduction

Omaima Nasir

Taif University , Turabah University College , Saudia Arabia

Title: Story of Gum Arabic (Acacia senegal ), Past , Present and Future
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Omaima has completed her PhD from Khartoum University, Sudan with a joint program scholarship from DAAD, Germany and postdoctoral studies from Tuebingen University, Germany. She has teaching experince of more than 15 years in Basic Sciences. She has been working as Aassociate Professor of physiology in Taif University. Omaima holds an international patent on efect of Gum arabic with more than 32 papers published  in reputed journals and now she is a group research leader working in different scientific fields in taif University.

 

Abstract:

Plant gum exudates have been exploited for several thousand years and still have a wide variety of practical applications particularly in the food industry, in which they are commonly used as food additives. Gum Arabic (GA) is derived from exudates of Acacia senegal or Acacia seyal trees.  Acacia is known as a good source of dietary fiber because it contains about 90 percent soluble fiber, is an important part of the diet. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved Acacia as an additive in foods and drugs. Currently, the principal source of GA is the Kordofan province of Sudan which produces over 80% of the world’s supply. Recent animal and clinical studies shed some light into mechanisms involved in the therapeutic action of GA and it may be useful in the prophylaxis and treatment of obesity, diabetes, colon carcinoma, inflammatory disease and malaria. The objective of the oral presentation is to provide a broad overview of the research data uncovering the biological effects of GA, and to highlight possible avenues for future research.

- Gum Arabic counteracts carbohydrate induced obesity, hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinism

- Gum arabic counteracts intestinal inflammation and tumor growth

- Gum Arabic gum possibly enhances bone mineralization

 

  • Medical Foods and Nutraceuticals
Location: 3

Session Introduction

Lama Alnaeli

Wellness by Design - Dubai Healthcare City

Title: Nutrition role in prevention and cure diseases
Speaker
Biography:

Lama Alnaeli is nationally known Nutritionist and clinical dietitian having several years of extensive experience in nutrition, health, wellness and natural living. She did Masters in Health & Nutritional Sciences from California, USA. She managed & attended wellness clinics in Syria then in UAE and through the power of nourishment she could change people live all over the world.
She is pursuing her ambition of “Let your food be your medicine” through her comprehensive writing, print & electronic media presence, personal appearances and private practices. She has a unique way of using mix methodologies and the last recent medical technologies and lab tests to customize the Wellness programs for her patients (i.e. Medical weight management).
Besides being the Brand Health Ambassador for Nestlé, She is an official Health and Diet Speaker for more than 10 local and International TV & radio channels including MBC Group TV, Sky News Arabia, and Dubai TV. Her weekly columns in Arabic magazines and newspapers along with her daily social media postings are followed by thousands of people from the region. Besides attending many international conferences in the Health & Nutrition field, Lama Alnaeli holds the honor of being the keynote speaker in different national conferences.
She is a member of American Dietetic Association & Canadian Diabetes Association. She is actively involved in different medical awareness campaigns and holds the title of Health advisor for Down Syndrome Association and Autism Association. Alnaeli is also a certified Health & Wellbeing Consultant and Public Speaker.

 

Abstract:

Starting with some statistics from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) which reports that chronic diseases are leading causes of death and disability, 70% of annual deaths are due to chronic diseases. These preventable conditions not only compromise quality of life, they add to rising health care costs (75% of the healthcare cost).
The good news is that we have the power to help prevent chronic disease, as making positive diet and lifestyle changes can help reduce risk. Eating healthy foods, getting enough exercise, and refraining from tobacco and excessive alcohol use confer numerous health benefits; including possibly preventing the onset of chronic diseases.

A study from the Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition in Harvard school of public health was done to assess the epidemiological evidence on diet and cancer and make public health recommendations.

They found that:
-  Overweight/obesity increases the risk for cancers of the oesophagus (adenocarcinoma), colorectal, breast (postmenopausal), endometrium and kidney and it was recommended that the body weight should be maintained in the body mass index range of 18.5-25 kg/m2, and weight gain in adulthood avoided.
- High Salt intake may possibly lead to stomach cancer; that's why it is highly recommended that we watch out our consumption of salt preserved foods.
- Scalding Hot drinks and foods may possibly increase the risk of oral cavity, pharynx and oesophagus cancer; hence it's recommended that the temperature of our intakes should always be moderate.
- Physical activity, the main determinant of energy expenditure, reduces the risk for colorectal cancer and reduces the risk for breast cancer; regular physical activity is highly advised.
Furthermore there are recent findings that food-based guidelines are reflected in specific dietary approaches to improve cardiovascular risk factors, such as the dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet and therapeutic Lifestyle changes, which have shown effectively, benefit hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, respectively. These diets, therefore, significantly reduce coronary heart disease risk and are effective in decreasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality risk.
To conclude, a healthy lifestyle and a good balanced diet are the key of healthy living. Medical nutrition therapy plays a key role not only in curing diseases, but also in preventing it.

 

Paras Sharma

Food Chemistry Division, ICMR-National Institute of Nutrition, India

Title: Nutritional and phytochemical characterization of colored barley germplasms
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Paras Sharma is working as scientist in Food Chemistry Division at ICMR-National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad. His research work is focused on food composition and analysis including nutrients, biological active compounds, radical scavenging activity analysis of different underutilized food as well as bioaccessibility of nutrients. He has published more than 35 research articles in international journal of repute. He is handling several government funded projects on underutilized pulses (Ricebean),  trans fatty acids (TFA) in processed foods and pigmented cereals. He is also member of several scientific societies and reviewer for many reputed journals.

 

Abstract:

Barley is 4th important cereal of the world however only limited amount of produced barley is utilized for direct human consumption (up to 4%). Barley is available in different forms including hull-less, hulled and colored type. Colored barley may contain elevated levels of bioactive compounds, anthocyanin, and polyphenols among cereals, which may help in management of NCDs. Very limited literature is available on pigmented barley, Therefore, present study is designed in order to assess the colored barley for its nutritional profiles and antioxidant potential.

Different colored hull-less barley germplasm namely were supplied by NBPGR, New Delhi (India) and wewe evaluated for different nutritional and antioxidant parameters. β-Glucan, a unique soluble dietary fiber in barley, ranged 4.1% (Karan) to 6.3% (Sheikh-B1). The highest total flavonoids content recorded for barley KP-6 while TPC varied between 2533 to 2933 μg/g, among all barley accessions evaluated. Preliminary HPLC screening for the individual polyphenols of barley exhibited that the p-hydroxybenzoic acid, caffeic acid, sinipic acid, ferulic acid and 4-coumaric acid was found the highest in barley germplasm sheikh-B1. DPPH-free radical scavenging activity was found to be in range of 29 to 46%, whereas all pigmented barley samples exhibited higher value of metal chelating activity than normal barley. β-Sitosterol was found to be the most predominant phytosterol and ranged between 28.84 to 58.07 mg/100g.

Overall, colored barley accessions have shown the higher content of bioactive compounds including  β-glucan, flavonoids and antioxidant potential which play important role in human health. Therefore, it may be promoted as healthy cereal.    

 

  • Food and Beverages
Location: 4
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Snehasis Chakraborty is working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Food Engineering and Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai. He has his expertise in evaluation and passion in process modeling and optimization of food processing operations. His research team basically focus on the kinetic modeling under different treatment conditions like thermal treatment and pulsed light processing. They have built the secondary kinetic model after 3 years of experience in pulsed light research. the information regarding the kinetic modeling will help in designing a robust pulsed light process condition for any fruit beverage to obtain an extended shelf-life while eliminating all the spoilage microflora in the product. 

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Consumer demand for minimally processed tropical fruit juice induces the possibilities of exploring nonthermal processes for the same. Pulsed light (PL) or high-intensity PL treatment is one of the emerging nonthermal techniques, which is gaining interest to the industry as it produces a microbially safe food product without or minimally affecting its phytochemicals and nutrient profile. The study aimed to explore the efficacy of pulsed light treatment on different microbial, enzymatic and biochemical properties of a mixed tropical fruit beverage followed by comparing the same with thermally treated one.

Methodology: The study explores the influence of pulsed light (PL) treatment on quality attributes of pineapple-amla based mixed fruit beverage within 1.8-2.4 kV/30-120 s/7.1-9.1 J·cm-2 per pulse (pulse-width 360 µs, 3 pulses per second). The quality attributes analyzed were color change (ΔE*), antioxidant capacity, total phenolic profile, ascorbic acid, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity, aerobic mesophilic count (AMC), yeast and mold count (YMC).

Findings: Both PL and thermal treatment have significantly reduced microbial load and enzyme activity in the beverage, and especially 5D reductions was achieved for both thermal and PL treatment in terms of aerobic mesophiles (AM) and yeast and molds (YM). PL has shown an improved retention of colour and ascorbic acid (AA) as compared to thermal treatments. Opposite to thermal processing an increase in phenolic content and antioxidant capacity was observed after PL treatment. Impact of thermal degradation of microorganisms, enzymes, AA, and loss of visual status (colour profile) were much greater than PL treatment. In case of both PL and thermal treatment polyphenoloxidase (PPO) enzyme and microbial group of YM were the most resistive, along with AA as the most sensitive bioactive nutrient. The study established the potential of PL treatment as an excellent alternative to thermal pasteurization of beverages.

 

  • Food Biochemistry and Microbiology
Location: 5

Session Introduction

Robert Mitchell

Nestle Institute of Material Sciences, Switzerland

Title: Material science approaches to meet consumer demands whilst ensuring product stability
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Robert Mitchell graduated from Cornell University (USA) with a degree in Food Science and a PhD from the University of Sheffield (UK) in Chemical Engineering.  As a scientist at Nestle Research in Lausanne, Switzerland he specialises in all aspects related to powder production, functionalisation and stability.  He also serves as corporate new ingredient expertise manager to accelerate innovation projects in the company.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: in the age of rapidly involving consumer trends and demands, it is vital that food and ingredient manufacturers be capable to quickly adapt processes to meet these needs.  For instance the trend of demanding clean-label and transparent ingredients/additives is accelerating, particularly when it comes to certain anticaking agents that could be considered as nanomaterials.  Another example is the rising concerns about the use of non-recyclable packaging materials and the implications that these have on the environment, particularly regarding waste in the oceans.  However in attempts to remove or replace undesired additives and packing materials, one often faces hurdles linked to product stability, particularly in products with a large overall surface area such as food powders. 
In the present talk we demonstrate material science-driven approaches – modifying product recipes, processes, storage & distribution, and packaging materials - that have been employed in order to optimize the functional behaviour of food powders while meeting consumer demands.

 

  • Pregnancy and Pre Pregnancy Nutrition
Location: 6

Session Introduction

Leena Raje

Shah College of Arts and Commerce, India

Title: Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Pregnancy Outcomes in Low Income Settings
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Leena Raje is working in the field of nutrition and healthcare for the past 35 years. The wide range of research projects conducted by her and research publications exhibit her keen interest in the field of food and nutrition. She is actively engaged in guiding Ph.D and Masters research scholars for the past 10 years. As the leader of a multi-faculty educational institution, she has been instrumental in health-promotion programmes and activities for adolescent girls and young adults.

 

Abstract:

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. The incidence of GDM is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of child bearing age. Maternal risk factors for pregnancies affected by GDM are excessive weight gain, preeclampsia and cesarean deliveries. Infants born to mothers with GDM are at risk of macrosomia, neonatal hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, respiratory distress syndrome, hyperbilirubinemia   and subsequent obesity and type 2 diabetes. The diagnosis and management of GDM is therefore very important and remains a challenge. The present study was conducted on 100 pregnant women from lower socio-economic strata in their second or third trimesters to observe the effects GDM on pregnancy outcomes. Women with poor glycemic control reported statistically significant differences in gestational period, type of delivery and neonatal birth weights (P < 0.001). Women with elevated blood glucose levels through the period of pregnancy reported a shorter period of gestation and/or delivery through c-section. Higher mean birth weight i.e. macrosomia was reported in mothers with higher blood glucose levels. The APGAR scores of all the infants were however reported to be normal. GDM, therefore was found to have some adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes in this study sample.

 

Day 2 :